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UNHOUSED
Creative Engagement With Global Housing Crises
Advocates Question Government Claim Homelessness in Decline 
This is a follow up to an earlier post about the U.S. government's recent unbelievable claims that chronic homelessness is dropping. Michael Stoops, in an interview with Melinda Tuhus of Between the Lines, squarely dismantles the report and points out that it, by design, under-reports homelessness based on its definitions of who is UNHOUSED and who is not.

Stoops also predicts a vast increase of the number of people without homes because of recent down turns in the economy, higher unemployment, the mortgage crises, municipalities unprepared to deal with the increases so they oppress rather than help, and more.

Homelessness is caused by structural inequalities in our society, ones that we have exacerbated – or elected officials to do so on our behalves – and done little as a nation to fix. And don't expect Barack Obama (or any other political leader) to solve this problem – don't expect a public accounting for all the brutal greed unleashed on this country by Ronald Reagan and neoliberal politicians and the resultant lack of social support infrastructure. Their putrid hateful ideology so thoroughly suffuses how we treat our fellow citizens that we should collectively be ashamed that we have allowed more than 1.6 million people to live without homes.

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Interview with Michael Stoops,
acting executive director of the National Coalition for the Homeless,
conducted by Melinda Tuhus

Listen to the interview.

According to a Bush administration report announced in late July, the number of chronically homeless people living on the nation's streets and in shelters has dropped by about 30 percent -- from about 176,000 to 124,000 -- from 2005 to 2007. Chronically homeless people make up 18 percent of the total number of homeless in the U.S. Officials at HUD, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, said the drop was largely due to implementation of its Housing First policy, in which hard-to-house individuals are placed in permanent shelter - apartments, halfway houses or rooms -- and provided services for drug addiction, mental illness and health problems.

Some housing advocates hail the reduction, but others are skeptical that more of the chronically homeless have, in fact, escaped homelessness. Many are also concerned about individuals and families who may be homeless for shorter periods of time or are not counted as homeless at all. Nationally, the government estimates the total number of homeless people in the U.S. has dropped to about 666,000 in 2007, from 754,000 in 2005.

Between The Lines' Melinda Tuhus spoke with Michael Stoops, acting executive director of the National Coalition for the Homeless. He addresses different definitions of homelessness that are used by the federal government and by advocacy groups, and predicts a coming wave of homelessness due to the home mortgage crisis.

Contact the National Coalition for the Homeless at (202) 462-4822 or visit their website at http://www.nationalhomeless.org
Comments 
Aug 17 (2008) (UTC) - ........
Anonymous
Your blog is interesting!

Keep up the good work!
Nov 13 (2010) (UTC)
Housing has become one of the biggest money making industry (maybe the second after oil industry) and, still a lot of people are homeless in this "rich" country. The banks' greed has no limit and I'd blame them all for this situation since a decent (not too fancy but just decent) house costs way too much for the “average Joe”. In addition the homeless problem is a jobless problem too.
criminal check
Nov 16 (2010) (UTC) - joke
This is another administration joke:)) How can homeless people numbers go down when the entire economy is facing this crisis? I mean, are we supposed to believe that 30% of the homeless people just found where a place to stay and a decent job? Come on... this is just another lie among many others...

Farmers Home Insurance
Nov 18 (2010) (UTC)
According to a Bush administration report announced in late July, the number of chronically homeless people living on the nation's streets and in shelters has dropped by about 30 percent -- from about 176,000 to 124,000 -- from 2005 to 2007.
Maybe a new administration comity should make a new report based on how things have "evolved" since 2007; let's not forget what happened during the last months of Bush's administration (2008): the financial crisis (which was perpetrated in the government's backyard) has left a lot of people without their homes. I'd really want to see the 2010's figures.
QASSATAN from drug rehab Washington
Dec 30 (2010) (UTC)
Nationally, the government estimates the total number of homeless people in the U.S. has dropped to about 666,000 in 2007, from 754,000 in 2005.

It would be interesting to find out how many of these homeless people are actually immigrants with no American citizenship; you'll be surprised to see the numbers. I bet a lot of them have no such problems since they haven't learn our "greedy ways" yet.
Global Visas
Jan 17 (2011) (UTC)
Anonymous
nice
Jan 25 (2011) (UTC) - drug rehab centers
Most homeless is due to drug and alcohol addiction. If we could get these people into drug rehab centers and teach them new ways of life and how to be happy without drugs and alcohol, we could be making a huge difference to the vibe of the entire world.
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